CultureStrike Magazine


CultureStrike Magazine features the work of artists on the front lines of the immigrant rights movement through original reporting, criticism, fiction, poetry, and visual art. Our content complicates our notions of migrant life, American life, borders, policy, and social justice all through the lens of cultural production. A project of both CultureStrike and Asian American Writers’ Workshop, CultureStrike Magazine is based out of New York City.  

We launched as a delegation of artists who gathered in protest of Arizona’s anti-immigrant law SB 1070 in 2011. Since then, our magazine has served as a platform for artists’ voices. We’ve published the work of both emerging and established writers and artists including Jessica Hagedorn, Wafaa Bilal, Fady Joudah, and Tania Bruguera. Teju Cole’s innovative essay, co-published on Twitter, recounts his time on the Arizona border with folks he met during his journey, including migrants, border patrol, and forensics investigators. Aziz Rana mined the history of the civil rights movement looking for lessons for today’s immigration activists. And John Washington reports from a California detention center where young DREAMers locked themselves to a chain-linked fence in protest.

For older articles, check out our past work at our Tumblr, archived here.

Our stories look closely at the inner workings of grassroots organizing as well as the mechanisms of poetry and performance, always with the understanding that the artistic process itself can be an act of resistance.

 

Write for us!

We’re always looking for a diverse pool of writers from all communities, particularly those with reporting backgrounds with a focus on art and politics. We want book reviews, interviews, features, and multimedia projects, especially content that takes advantage of our digital platform. For more information, please see our guidelines.

 

 

A Message from CultureStrike Executive Director Sham-e-Ali Nayeem

"It is through art and culture that we are able to shift our collective consciousness and transform this grim political climate we find ourselves in. There is a significant cost our communities pay when we are not the ones uplifting our own truths. We have a tremendous opportunity to strengthen our creative alliances and shift cultural narratives that harm us. I invite us all to imagine the kind of world we wish to see and assert the safety and dignity of our communities." Donate Now!