Nonfiction


This merits a response

A response to the “Take This Hammer” exhibit
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This merits a response

First: Gentrify my love.

“You haven’t seen it? Wait, you have to see it.” We interrupt our regular Pigeon Palace weekly co-op meeting to break into a “Google Google Apps Apps” viewing party. It’s 2013 and bodacious queens scurry across a screen in my top floor rent-controlled apartment in the Mission to the dance beat of “gringa gringa apps apps” with punctuating bellows of “I just wanna wanna be WHITE!”

Childhood in War and Wilderneress

At 80, a Scientist Examines War and the Natural World
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David Suzuki, a noted Canadian scientist and environmental activist, has the privilege of being able to look back and forward on life. He’s lived plenty of it, and at 80, he can look back with a sense wizened humility and continuity that tends to accompany a well-lived life. But over the decades he’s earned the authority to speak out on issues of power and politics with the urgency that tends to accompany the values of a grandparent.

A Bond of Poetry

Seeking Asylum through the Written Verse
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After spending 444 days in a detention center in Arizona, an immigrant bought her own freedom with poetry. Alexandra Golugosova, a thirty-two year old woman from Russia, with a facility for languages and a newly inspired poetic flair, sent her poems to people in return for donations and raised enough money to pay her bond, with the help of a poet friend and a group of LGBTQ immigrant activists 

Airplanes and Cages

Going home in a body bag
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Reports have surfaced of torture and abuse of immigrants in federal detention, though perhaps the stories come too late. The migrants have been sent back to their countries of origin already, part of a group of 85 South Asian asylum seekers who were repatriated on a charter flight after they had attempted and failed to secure humanitarian relief. As far as the US government is concerned, they are non-persons, aliens, and so they were "removed", excised from the American body politic. Today many are back in a hostile homeland, fearing political persecution and mob violence.

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A Message from Favianna Rodriguez

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