immigration


The DREAM Act 2017

Will A DREAM Act This Year Fuel An Immigration Nightmare In The Future?
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When I first heard that a federal DREAM Act was rumored to be reintroduced this year, I’m not going to lie: a small part of me felt a spark of hope ignite. I’m 34 years old. I’ve been living in this country for 32 years as an undocumented person, and frankly, I’m over it. Though I’ve found ways to live my life, seize opportunities and push open doors, I can only (selfishly) imagine the kinds of doors that I could step through if only I didn’t have this albatross around my neck.

From Arrival to Renewal

Migration is Uplifting Downtrodden Communities
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Italy may be home to some of the oldest civilizations in the world, but its endurance over millenia of cultural evolution have also pushed it the cusp of Europe's future. This nation suspended between the Old World and the New, has become the point of arrival for migrants from the Global South to the North.

Reaching Across Borders, and Across the Table

Cooking Up Resistance in Court

Patrick loves cooking for his family. It's one thing that reminds him of home: all the homes he's had from Jamaica to Philadelphia to Georgia. And while his homecooked meals have nourished his children throughout their lives and pleased guests from every corner of the diaspora, he struggled for years for the right to remain on the same soil as his family. And in a harsh system that punishes those who have forged human relationships that don't comply with immigration laws, he struggled to prove that he was entitled to stay by strutting his stuff...as a chef.

What they Carry

The Burdens Syria's Children Bring Across the Frontline
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The children of Syria's civil war take the war with them. Some escape, barely, into hostile neighboring lands. Others remain trapped in the warzone. None are safe. The White House, meanwhile, has sought to ban refugees from Syria and several other Muslim-majority countries, "until our country's representatives can figure out what the hell is going on,” in the words of President Trump.

Identifying Indivisibility

Unmasking Denialism in the South Asian American Community
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Islamophobia in Trump’s America is not a new headline, but in recent weeks it crossed into a new frontier, directly into the homes of Indian—specifically Hindu—families. The shock reverberated through the shooting of two immigrants from Hyderbad, Alok Madasani and Srinivas Kuchibhotia, by a white xenophobe named Adam Purinton, in the town of Olathe, Kansas, outside of Kansas City. Witnesses reported he thought they were Muslim, and that Purinton had initially claimed he’d shot two Iranians.

A Child's Eye View

Children's Stories of Refugee Journeys
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There are some things that kids should never see. But for the children who cross borders by land or sea, they are exposed to everything, and they are spared no cruelty on the long, violent journey to what they’ve been told is a safe space.

When Migrant Women Marched in London

Remembering the "Strikers in Saris" 40 years later
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For one hot summer 40 years ago, West London was turned upside down: mass demonstrations filled the streets,  the hardscrabble city was on fire with radical fervor, and police and protesters clashed with a ferocity never before seen in postwar Britain. But this wasn't your grandmother's working-class uprising. Well, actually, it was. Because the chief agitators behind this affair were whom everyone least expected.

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A Message from Favianna Rodriguez

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