News and Features


Identifying Indivisibility

Unmasking Denialism in the South Asian American Community
Written by

 

Islamophobia in Trump’s America is not a new headline, but in recent weeks it crossed into a new frontier, directly into the homes of Indian—specifically Hindu—families. The shock reverberated through the shooting of two immigrants from Hyderbad, Alok Madasani and Srinivas Kuchibhotia, by a white xenophobe named Adam Purinton, in the town of Olathe, Kansas, outside of Kansas City. Witnesses reported he thought they were Muslim, and that Purinton had initially claimed he’d shot two Iranians.

A Radical Farm's Roots Stem From Revived Korean Heritage

Namu Farm Bridges East and West, to Bring Tradition into the a Green Future
Written by

Sometimes, finding your way home takes you to the other side of the world and back. That's the journey that brought Kristyn Leach, a Korean American who was adopted as an infant, back to the country of her birth, and then home again to Namu Farm in the San Francisco Bay Area. Built on about an acre of Alameda County's publicly supported urban farmland, her tiny farming venture has combined two farming cultures in a method of small-scale agriculture known as "natural farming."

Retracing a Pilgrimage

After Christmas, Activists March Toward Crisis in Pursuit of Hope
Written by

The original refugee story of the holiday season was the nativity, with the migration of a young family in search of a place of sanctuary. Today's holiday refugee story begins with a similar quest to a destination unknown, but it started the day after Christmas, not in a ramshackle manger by the roadside in Bethlehem but at a retired airport in Berlin. A group of activists gathered at Templehof Airport to start a similarly perilous journey--a pilgrimage to the ancient city of Aleppo, marching back into a biblical land overtaken by humanitarian crisis.

Refuge in the Jungle

In its final days, an enclave in France stands as a testament to migrant survival
Written by

The migrant encampment known as "The Jungle" in the port city of Calais, France, is set to shut down starting the week of October 24. The British and French authorities who administer the area have, after months of political squabbles, moved to demolish the vast shanty town that migrants have built here as they seek passage to the United Kingdom by road. For those stuck in limbo at the border, authorities have promised to move remaining residents to supposedly safer shelters.

Haiti: Healing at Home and Abroad

Written by

Hurricane Matthew has cut through Haiti and left destruction in its wake. The level of devastation, not seen since the massive earthquake hit in 2010, is difficult to put into words. Yet despite Haiti's singular suffering and unique history of struggle over the decades, the island nation is also one of the most outward facing places in the Western hemisphere. The fate of Haiti is intricately connected to its diaspora, and the networks that have been built over the years with the help of Haiti's migrants working abroad have had a complex and instrumental relationship to the motherland.

Pages

A Message from Favianna Rodriguez

"Art is always a reflection, a testament and a record of our human condition." Donate Now!